largecoin:

this is the the tea cup from which i spill the truth tea from

largecoin:

this is the the tea cup from which i spill the truth tea from

(via aleatoryalarmalligator)

378 notes

theswinginsixties:

Traffic — Hole in My Shoe - 1967

(Source: the-theme-is)

138 Plays

71 notes

(via cinoh)

7 notes

thekinksdaily:

The Kinks - She’s Bought a Hat Like Princess Marina

(via aleatoryalarmalligator)

12 Plays

21 notes

thekinksdaily:

The Kinks - Picture Book

(via aleatoryalarmalligator)

73 Plays

137 notes

bbook:

After spending his early twenties writing film criticism and aspiring to make films of own, Schrader was hovering around Hollywood, unsettled by the films presented to him. What he saw were pictures that “exalted idiosyncrasy and the cult of personality,” focusing on me and not we, highlighting the importance of individuality as a means of understanding oneself on a greater level. However, through his time spent admiring Eames and learning from his work, Schrader came to find a person who exposed him that to the idea that the cult of personality was in fact ephemeral, flowing from one person to the next, uniting humanity with a deeper kind of likeness.
Schrader claims it was that sentiment, combined with the thought that “images are ideas,” which overturned his world. The article he wrote on Eames would be published in Film Quarterly in the Spring of 1970, and was titled “Poetry of Ideas.” The focus was on Eames’ short films created with his wife, Ray, and how they exemplified something entirely unique to the cinematic tradition. Amalgamating science and technology to convey their own means of communication, Schrader said the films possessed a “unified aesthetic with many branch-like manifestations,” and that they had a “cerebral sensibility” seldom seen in the medium.
A Brief Look Back on Paul Schrader and the Man Who Overturned His World, Charles Eames

bbook:

After spending his early twenties writing film criticism and aspiring to make films of own, Schrader was hovering around Hollywood, unsettled by the films presented to him. What he saw were pictures that “exalted idiosyncrasy and the cult of personality,” focusing on me and not we, highlighting the importance of individuality as a means of understanding oneself on a greater level. However, through his time spent admiring Eames and learning from his work, Schrader came to find a person who exposed him that to the idea that the cult of personality was in fact ephemeral, flowing from one person to the next, uniting humanity with a deeper kind of likeness.

Schrader claims it was that sentiment, combined with the thought that “images are ideas,” which overturned his world. The article he wrote on Eames would be published in Film Quarterly in the Spring of 1970, and was titled “Poetry of Ideas.” The focus was on Eames’ short films created with his wife, Ray, and how they exemplified something entirely unique to the cinematic tradition. Amalgamating science and technology to convey their own means of communication, Schrader said the films possessed a “unified aesthetic with many branch-like manifestations,” and that they had a “cerebral sensibility” seldom seen in the medium.

A Brief Look Back on Paul Schrader and the Man Who Overturned His World, Charles Eames

72 notes

854 Plays

190 notes

(Source: gizmobennelli, via thegiftsoflife)

138 notes

astonishing-moments:

Teresa Yondo

astonishing-moments:

Teresa Yondo

(via thegiftsoflife)

335 notes

magictransistor:

John Heartfield cover design for Upton Sinclair’s ‘Der Sumpf’ (The Jungle), 1924.

magictransistor:

John Heartfield cover design for Upton Sinclair’s ‘Der Sumpf’ (The Jungle), 1924.

(via aleatoryalarmalligator)

131 notes

joereorda:

Grayson Perry Map of Nowhere (blue), 2008 Colour etching from five plates Sheet size: 153 x 113 cm  (60 1/4 x 44 1/2 in)

joereorda:

Grayson Perry
Map of Nowhere (blue), 2008
Colour etching from five plates
Sheet size: 153 x 113 cm
(60 1/4 x 44 1/2 in)

(via emmaaimelesroses)

170 notes

(Source: scarymansion)

139 notes

blastedheath:

Fernando Calhau (Portuguese, 1948-2002), Sem Título # 116, 1998. Acrylic on linen canvas, 190 x 190 cm.

blastedheath:

Fernando Calhau (Portuguese, 1948-2002), Sem Título # 116, 1998. Acrylic on linen canvas, 190 x 190 cm.

(via emmaaimelesroses)

280 notes

handmadepride:

Click here for more handmade goodness.

handmadepride:

Click here for more handmade goodness.

(Source: jansschwester.blogspot.de)

101 notes

medverf:

Abel Auer 

medverf:

Abel Auer 

(via aleatoryalarmalligator)

29 notes